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Ben Kinchlow: Concern for Americans

CBN.com “The most dangerous citizen is not armed, but uninformed,” says Ben Kinchlow in his new book Black YellowDogs. According to Ben, a 'YellowDog” is traditionally someone who votes Democrat, period, no matter the issue or candidate.

The term dates back to the 1928 presidential elections when Deep South rank-and-file Democrats stayed committed to supporting the Democratic ticket for NY Governor, Al Smith over Herbert Hoover. Ben wrote Black YellowDogs to encourage African-Americans to vote according to “principle” not always “party affiliation,” and to point out that African Americans should traditionally be allies of the Conservatives.

Ben says that since the '60s, the black vote has had an impact on both parties; positive for the Democrats, and negative for Republicans. The strategy for the Republican Party has been to pick up a few votes in the black community and neutralize the rest by a large turnout among white voters. If a party can make significant inroads into the Hispanic community, they will begin to question the necessity of making even token overtures to the Black community. “After all,” the argument will run, “No matter what we do, they are going to vote Democrat,” says Ben.

Arguably one of the most religious groups in America, Blacks often find themselves in the unenviable position of voting against their own religious beliefs. They generally oppose same-sex marriages and abortions but, by voting as Yellow Dog Democrats, actually find themselves helping to elect candidates who openly support the very issues they oppose.

Ben's book tackles subjects that concern all Americans but specifically, African-Americans in particular. In his book, he encourages African-Americans to look at history as well as confront many uncomfortable truths such as: Slavery in America, Ku Klux Klan, African-Americans voting Democrat, affirmative action education and civil rights leaders.

RAISED RIGHT

Ben was raised in a strict, loving, church-attending family.  When Ben’s father was saved, he became a preacher and pastored several churches.  Though Ben’s home life was stable and happy, growing up black in the South was difficult for him.  Because there was no high school for blacks in Uvalde, Texas, Ben and seven other black students had to attend a Catholic high school in San Antonio over 80 miles away.  It was there that he learned about life in the streets and every bad thing that went with it.  He felt isolated and alone. 

Ben joined the Air Force and served for over 13 years.  His time in the service let him see the world and a part of life he never knew.  He saw what life could be like out of the South for a black man.  He met and married Vivian but their marriage soon turned rocky.  Ben was bitter and angry towards the discrimination he felt and degenerated morally from his childhood teachings.  He turned towards the teachings of Malcolm X and his strong beliefs led to his separation from the military when he refused to accept an assignment to Korea to fight the “white man’s war.” 

As his life crumbled around him – he was near divorce from Vivian after twice trying to murder two men. 

Later, love came into his life from an unexpected course - A Christian white man named John who radiated the love of Jesus, touched the angry, hard, cynical Ben.

Ben was dismayed to discover that Jesus was the key to John’s life.  He thought Christianity was for “suckers.”  One day as he rounded the race track at high speed (his job was to test tires for a tire company), the words “My heavenly Father watches over me” sprang to his lips.  It happened again and Ben knew that God was speaking to him.  He gave his life to Christ and wept.  This was the beginning of great changes for Ben.  God restored his marriage and, after spiritual preparation and teaching (he was also filled with the Holy Spirit), Ben was sent to preach the Gospel and touch many lives.

ON HIS OWN

Today Ben is a minister, broadcaster, author and businessman. He travels in the US and abroad as a motivational and inspirational speaker.  He is also involved in an outreach for Israel through his company, Americans for Israel, hosting a local radio broadcast called “Second Opinion” and involved with an outreach through Ben Kinchlow ministries that feeds starving children. Ben also co-hosts “Front Page Jerusalem,” an unbiased news and commentary broadcast of issues affecting Israel today.   

He founded “His Place,” a ministry for teens in 1971.  Later, he directed a drug and alcohol rehabilitation program at Christian Farms in Killeen, Texas.  In 1971, Ben was ordained in the African Methodist Episcopal Church.  Ben came to CBN to serve as the Director of Counseling in 1975.  He was eventually promoted to Executive Vice President for Domestic Ministries in 1982.  Ben is also known throughout the world as the long time Co-Host of the 700 Club.  After twenty years, Ben left CBN to begin independent ministry.

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