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Truett Cathy's Legacy: The Difference Faith Makes

09-09-2014
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Family, friends, and admirers will pay respect Tuesday to Chick-fil-A founder S. Truett Cathy at a public viewing at First Baptist Church in Jonesboro, Georgia.

Cathy passed away Monday at the age of 93.

Cathy was a man of faith and that's reflected in many of his guiding principles and policies, starting with Chick-fil-A's corporate purpose statement, which begins, "to glorify God by being a faithful steward to all that is entrusted to us."

He also advised business people to "put principles and people ahead of profits" and to "invite God to be involved in every decision."

He encouraged his restaurant operators to give back to their communities by supporting local schools, hospitals, and little leagues.

Dr. Kathleen Patterson, of the Regent University School of Business and Leadership, talked more Cathy's Christian legacy on CBN News Today, September 9.
    
Cathy is best known, however, for the policy of closing on Sundays, sacrificing potential profits to take a day of rest and honor God.

"People appreciate you being consistent with your faith," Cathy told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution in 2006. "It's a silent witness to the Lord when people go into shopping malls, and everyone is bustling, and you see that Chick-fil-A is closed."

He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Jeannette McNeil Cathy; sons Dan T. and Don "Bubba" Cathy; daughter Trudy Cathy White; 19 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren.

Cathy will be buried in a private family ceremony on Thursday.

In 1996, Cathy appeared on The 700 Club with Pat Robertson. He talked about Chick-fil-A's success and his commitment to stay closed on Sundays.

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