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Grandpa Dance-Offs and Amazing Grace Through Glass: These Powerful Pandemic Stories Will Touch Your Heart

04-01-2020
Image Credit: Facebook/Sherrie Neely: Permission to use
Image Credit: Facebook/Sherrie Neely: Permission to use

As the world copes with ongoing restrictions and rules for social distancing, people have found new ways to stay connected with friends and family – and share their stories of hope. 

Sherrie Neely posted a video on Instagram of her 81-year-old father having a dance-off with his 6-year-old granddaughter in Nashville, Tennessee.

They live across the street from each other, so now they meet by the road for some dance-off action.

Neely wrote, "My 6yo daughter has an extremely close relationship with her 'Papa,' and they've now started daily dance-offs since the virus is keeping them separated. My Dad is 81 years old and I've never seen him dance, but he's really putting forth great effort!!!"

John Kline from Montgomery, Alabama is unable to visit his wife Ann who is battling Alzheimer's and lives in a nursing home. Visitors are no longer permitted inside John Knox Manor Nursing Home, so Kline visits his "Sweet Ann" through a window...and they sing classic Christian songs together. 

Kline shared a heartwarming video on Facebook of the couple singing "Amazing Grace." He told The Montgomery Advisor that he was sending a message to others and we should never give up on love.

"I'm trying to make the statement that no matter what happens, there's no reason to give up on love. If she gets where she doesn't know me, I will still go see her, because I will still know her," he said.

Kline wrote on Facebook, "I love my Sweet Ann and look forward to spending eternity with her. God bless you for even looking - and if you listened, well that was because you wanted to hear Ann."

In another heartwarming display of kindness during this crisis, one woman was moved to tears when a Minnesota trooper gave her a handful of N95 masks instead of a speeding ticket.

Sarosh Ashraf Janjua says on Instagram that she's a cardiologist, explaining that this simple act of mercy from the police officer was a sign of hope.

"Five N95 masks, from the supply the state had given him for his protection. I burst into tears. This complete stranger, who owed me nothing and is more on the front lines than I am, shared his precious masks with me, without my even asking. The veil of civilization may be thin, but not all that lies behind it is savage. We are going to be ok." 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A Minnesota State trooper pulled me over on I-35 this past weekend for driving above the speed limit. When he saw my Massachusetts driver’s license, he asked me what I was doing all the way out in Minnesota, so I told him I travel here every month for my work as a locums cardiologist. He went back to his patrol car to look up my license, and when he returned, quite firmly told me it was very irresponsible of me to be speeding, especially since I would not only take up resources if I got into an accident, but would also not be in a position to help patients. Feeling thoroughly chastised, I waited for him to write me a ticket. Instead, he told me he was going to let me off with a warning. As I sputtered to apologize and say thank you, he reached in to hand me what I assumed was my license back. It wasn’t until my hand had closed around what he was giving me that its unexpected bulkiness drew my eyes to it. Five N95 masks, from the supply the state had given him for his protection. I burst into tears. And though it may just have been the cold wind, I think he teared up a little as well, before wishing me well and walking away. Like all healthcare workers and emergency responders around the world, I have felt afraid of not having adequate protective equipment, and in my darkest moments, have worried about what would happen if I fell sick far from home. This complete stranger, who owed me nothing and is more on the front lines than I am, shared his precious masks with me, without my even asking. The veil of civilization may be thin, but not all that lies behind it is savage. We are going to be ok.

A post shared by Sarosh Ashraf Janjua (@sajanjua) on

And a group of friends in Shakopee, Minnesota found a creative way to have breakfast and coffee together while catching up on life.

LoveWhatMatters.com reports that the ladies met in a parking lot one morning and talked to each other from the trunks of their cars.

"It cleared all our minds and made the unknown future not look so scary. Seeing our friends faces in person, somehow, made this COVID-19 pandemic not so daunting. And it was SO needed," said one of the friends.

The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed many amazing moments as the world adapts to this new way of life. 

While our nation journeys through the coronavirus crisis, CBN News is inviting readers to share moments of hope through social media posts and video files by sending your links to Newswatch@cbn.org.

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